Black San Franciscans will Become History Unless We Stop Displacing Them

by Olivia Glowacki

Black people make up less than 6 percent of San Francisco’s general population and 34 percent of the city’s homeless population, according to the 2017 San Francisco Homeless Count & Survey. Other sources put the percentage of homeless families who are Black at 50 percent and this number has been on the rise since the 1980s. While gentrification and greed grow, San Franciscans who were born, raised, and now raise their children here,

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LIMBO AT THE DROP-IN

by TJ Johnston

It’s 4 p.m. and I’ve been waiting two hours already to get a seat at the MSC South drop-in. I spent the last two hours outside waiting in line with about 10 or 12 other homeless people ahead of me — that is, if nobody cuts ahead.

I want to get a bed for the night, and the only things standing between me and that bed are the gate at the entrance,

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$88.5 MILLION FOR HOMELESS HOUSING AND SERVICES LEAVES OUT FUNDING FOR HOMELESS FAMILIES, YOUTH

On Tuesday, the Board of Supervisors unanimously voted to approve a spending deal that will fund upwards of $200 million for salary raises for public school teachers and childcare providers as well as affordable housing and homeless services.

The funds originate from the Educational Revenue Augmentation Fund (ERAF). Established in 1992 by the state of California, the fund essentially takes away money from counties in the form of property taxes to be used for school districts,

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No Shelter from the Storm

by Brian Edwards

“During the first heavy storm of February, a really sweet older gentleman who sells the Street Sheet rang the bell to our office. When I opened the door, I could barely recognize him. He was shaking, soaking wet, and couldn’t even walk up the stairs without my help. His hands, bone white and shriveled from the rain, shook so badly that it was nearly impossible for him to drink the hot tea we’d given him.

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The Navigation Center

An Inside look at all of them

by Shy Brown

Since the first Navigation Center opened like five years ago, there have been multiple popping up all over San Francisco. Let’s take a look at all of them:

The first one was on 16th and Mission, it is currently closed down. That was the very first one to open, with multiple flaws that came along with that as well,

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THE SHELTER

By Darnell Boyd

Feb. 15, 2019

I will never forget that day. It was July 17, the day I first arrived in San Francisco. It was a cold, wet and rainy day when the Greyhound bus pulled into the station. I couldn’t help but think to myself, “What happened to the summer?” because two days before, I was in Phoenix and it was 115 degrees. I knew right then that I needed to find a shelter,

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Revisiting California’s 2018 Housing Progress

by Nick Fish

In January 2018, far reaching assembly bill 1506 progressed as the latest attempt by assembly member Richard Bloom of Santa Monica. Along with his peers, Bloom has vehemently committed himself to repealing the Costa-Hawkins Act of 1995, which he believes has strangled California’s housing stock for over two decades.

In a less than dramatic outcome, it lacked support to push through the first hearing. Republican Caucus members Steven Choi and Marc Steinorth opposed the measure,

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Windfall Funding Should Be Used to House Houseless

by Coalition on Homelessness

In yet another magical moment in a string of magical moments since we began our journey to pass Our City Our Home (OCOH), the revenue measure that doubles the city’s homeless efforts, the city received $415 million in unanticipated revenue. This was two years’ worth of Educational Revenue Augmentation fund or ERAF, which is basically excess property tax that goes to the state and back to us. 

The Our City Our Home Coalition is recommending that $171.4 million of that go to properly begin implementing November 2018’s Prop C “Our City Our Home,” which passed with over 60% approval,

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CA Threatens to Turn Back the Clock on Mental Health Care

by Alex V Barnard

When it was passed in 1967, California’s Lanterman-Petris-Short (LPS) Act—which sets the legal requirements for involuntary commitments to psychiatric hospitals—was hailed as the “Magna Carta of the mentally ill.” The new rights and legal protections it created helped make California a leader in the de-institutionalization of people living with mental illnesses. Now, the state is considering swinging the pendulum back towards custodial care. It should not turn back the clock lightly.

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